Christian Faur

February 23, 2009 § 47 Comments

This is pretty insane stuff. From the artist, Christian Faur:

I have assembled more than one hundred thousand hand cast crayons of varying colors and shades to produce a body of work that, to the best of my knowledge, is unlike anything done before in art.

http://shapeandcolour.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/christian-faur-crayons.jpg?w=500&h=258

http://designyoutrust.com/wp-content/uploads5/christianfaurcrayons2_01.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/miscellaneous/images_lg/image14.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/crayonSeries1/images_lg/image6.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/crayonSeries1/images_lg/image1_self.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/crayonSeries1/images_lg/image2.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/crayonSeries1/images_lg/image3.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/crayonSeries1/images_lg/image4.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/crayonSeries1/images_lg/image5.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/crayonSeries1/images_lg/image13.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/forgottenChildren/images_lg/image1.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/miscellaneous/images_lg/image9.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/miscellaneous/images_lg/image12.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/crayonSeries1/images_lg/image9.jpg

http://www.christianfaur.com/crayons/crayonSeries1/images_lg/image12.jpg

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§ 47 Responses to Christian Faur

  • Pur Sang says:

    Very , very nice !
    It’s indeed something I haven’t seen before.

  • Darren Dale says:

    Indeed, very interesting. Are you familiar with Chuck Close?

  • [...] Posted on March 2, 2009 by butnerblogspot Here is a most amazing collection of art made of crayons, simply breathtaking. Image: Christian [...]

  • Regan DuCasse says:

    Not to be observed close up. Makes one feel farsighted. I’m an artist myself and struggle with interest enough to stay on task day after day. I suppose I’m trying to understand the sort of person to takes found, ready made objects and with so much deliberation, creates rather simplistic pieces.
    Crayons are marvelous as instruments of color application. I think in so many ways, the effect here is paint by numbers. The closer one inspects these, the blurrier the picture, the more evident the crayon. Whereas, the application of strokes, the style that conveys wrist control and the extension of brain, through arm, through hand and fingers isn’t a part of this scheme.
    I like crayons, especially the old fashioned way of utility. This might be a ‘new ‘ way of using them, but there is no intimacy, I would think…along the way like there is when one is drawing a sketch with them. I imagine you have to stand WAY back constantly, perhaps even use a grid scheme to put the colors in the right area. There is no epiphany of sensation here, no warmth (hah, that would melt the crayons!), no sense of individuality, other than the novel use of crayons as a kind of pixel.
    Must be hell to dust….

  • Patrick R. says:

    Awesome work!

  • kim moen says:

    What a beautiful idea and what execution!

  • eleanor says:

    Haha. AWESOME. Would suck if it all melted. or would it….

  • Eric Alder says:

    Well, it’s not absolutely unique, being basically a pointillist style (even the child’s toy, Lite-Brite, is basically pointillism), but the use of crayons is a new twist to me. Nice work.

    I wonder – how it would look if you used a heat gun to partially melt the crayons? I’ll bet that technique would open up even more possibilities.

    (Please post pictures if you try it!)

  • ryan says:

    I like it. The next step does seem to be to melt them.

  • bobby says:

    People like Regan DuCasse make people like me hate art.

  • KevinB83 says:

    here’s what regan ducasse (#3 commenter) had to say about an assemblage of thread spools.

    spool art by devorah sperber

    http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/10/view/4923/spool-art-by-devorah-sperber.html

    I won’t criticize the commitment and inventiveness of these pieces. However, I do wonder at whether there is some original art from Ms. Sperber.

    Very often one could mistake the discipline involved with these creations as a symptom of OCD.
    This is very true of modern art that requires a great deal of repetitive application of shapes and color.
    But as with those who make incredible miniatures, the eyes of the artist reveal much to us.
    And we can question the sanity of some artists and have for centuries…

    But there is a saying “It’s the cracked ones that let the sun shine through.”

    Well done Ms. Sperber…
    Regan DuCasse 01.02.09

    # # # # # #

    if regan ducasse were consistent in his/her critique, both works would be dismissed as compulsive arrangements of found objects yielding simplistic pieces. why the disparity? and wherefore art thou complex artwork dear artist?

  • rose says:

    same here bobby

  • Robert E says:

    Very clever. I love the interplay of color in the otherwise monochromatic images.
    As well as the mystery and intrigue regarding the crayons permanance. Melting is an interesting option, but I prefer the soldier-like stance and perfect crayon tips. I bet these are very pleasing to have on a wall and be able to move back and forth in front of them and watch the image shift. That in itself is kind of cool, the art is static and the viewer becomes kinetic.

  • i am the moon master says:

    yo! Regan DuCasse.. is a bitch.. and needs to get anally fisted by a fucking cave troll

  • Foster says:

    great images.
    foster

  • [...] Christian Faur creates amazingly vivid pictures with raised crayons. Example: [...]

  • chrissy says:

    You guys need to back off Regan… He kindly states before each of his statements that “I think” “I imagine”. Its just his opinion he’s not attacking yours. While I may disagree with his statement that more painterly art is innately more expressive he makes vallid points to me. Besides isn’t art made to be discussed, critized, and pondered over?


    ryotart over at deviantart

  • Hannah says:

    Herb Williams, a Nashville TN based artist, also does crayon art. Mostly sculpture, some pictures. But the concept is not new.
    http://www.herbwilliamsart.com/crayonsculpture

  • maricar2323 says:

    ohh ur so gud i doubt if uh are a boring person

  • lori78 says:

    It’s beautiful! That’s all that matters…

  • Le Minxxx says:

    That’s freakin’ cool!!

  • uokiok says:

    I like eating crayons, so i find this work delicious.

  • amber says:

    that is AWESOME! that had to take forever!

  • Renee says:

    There is so much depth to Christian Faur’s pieces that cannot be seen via the web. First, all of his crayons are handmade, not store bought. He has 14 shades of gray alone. You need so many shades to create the three-dimensionality of the pieces. He breaks down an image into color blocks, and then draws a grid to show him exactly where to place each crayon.

    Also, Christian has developed a language out of color. You can see it at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_alphabet. The “bursts” of color in some of the pieces are actually words.

    It is quite brilliant.

  • [...] York on Mar.04, 2009, under Design Christian Faur « PICDIT. No comments for this entry [...]

  • Mcg says:

    Awesome. But the colored crayons in the black and white pieces, are annoying.

  • Nate Snyder says:

    It would appear to me that Regan DuCasse missed an obvious aspect of this work on his March 2, 2009 comment. No warmth? No intimacy? How about the warmth and intimacy of a childhood coloring utensil used to create cold, computerized imagery and sterile representations?

    The works of art themselves are, of course, beautiful. But, the meaning overall is more than sheer novelty, obviously. The juxtaposition of elements here is not the crayons, but the emotions which this artist has so brilliantly and seemingly effortlessly induced so perfectly. And even here the artist must be given due credit since these were anything but “effortless.” Absolutely brilliant work!

  • Phil says:

    Brings to mind the creativity behind some of Phil Hansen’s work, albeit without the final destruction.

    http://www.philinthecircle.com/goodbyeart.html

    Not to diminish the creativity of your pieces at all. My favorite piece would probably be the honeycomb w/ bees. Well done.

  • Wesha says:

    It just begs to be automated. Somebody should make a robot out of Lego blocks to make pictures like this automatically. You draw in Photoshop/Corel/whatever, the robot places crayons in the box one per pixel…

  • [...] Faur uses individual crayons like a pointillist uses points, or an offset press uses dots. And as his body of work shows, there’s pretty much nothing you can’t do with enough crayons and enough [...]

  • XiaoXi says:

    Meh. Looks like one of those “digitize your photo into needlepoint canvas” and then, instead of needlework, each “stitch” is a crayon…Even the picture doesn’t seem to include original artwork.

    Still, looks neat–just like needlework or jellybean art.

  • [...] Christian Faur « PICDIT art made from crayons (tags: photo cool art) [...]

  • stacey says:

    lightbright? are you kidding? and i was happy with making the peacock!

  • Someone says:

    Here is what Regan DuCasse was trying to say, in simple terms.

    This is not art. This is craft. Try and educate yourself on the difference, or people like Christian Faur will continue to exploit you with their gimmicks of pop “art”.

  • Hitchcock says:

    And the best part is that you can eat it!

  • Someone says:

    Big deal, I have a LightBrite too.

  • Art Appreciator says:

    Hmmm… http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/art?qsrc=2888
    It sure seems like this would fall under the #12 definition of art….
    Or do Someone and Regan also get to define “art”.
    Regan may have begun all of his sentences with “I think” or “I believe” or whatever. The thing is some of us believe we disagree. And while they may not have stated it in the nicest way possible, I think they believe Regan didn’t either.

  • Someone says:

    @Art Appreciator:
    First, #31 is an imposter.
    Second, it is not I who gets to define art. Not your dictionary, either. We have usurped the term art, which in its truest form seeks to explore and express archetypal aspects of humanity in a universally understandable way, and have applied the term willy-nilly to all things that appear to take an ounce of creativity or skill. I will call this “artist” inventive (though possibly not creative), but I will not call the above product “art”. There is no purpose to this “art” other than to “look cool” and make people say “wow, crayons”. Any attempt to say “well, I think it speaks about the beauty that can be found in the ordinary things around us” or something about the “simplicity of a child’s crayons” as some above have tried, is just exactly what this “artist” is relying on you to do for his gimmick to work — for you to elevate him to genius status. He is happy to let the rest of the world clamor about in search of his motivations and expression because he has none of his own; if he did he would have represented something in this new “medium” other than photographic images. Anybody can reproduce this technique, and the basic concept is even unoriginal. There is no unique voice here.

    No, it is history that gets to define true art. History will show that this is not art, in the way that nobody will care to remember or preserve it for any significant amount of time.

    I knew someone who didn’t understand the difference between art and craft would force me to get more specific. And I should have known it would have been somebody with a name like “Art Appreciator”.

  • Robin Jones says:

    Christian,
    Sorry to tell you but this has been done before. Several years ago I created a “crayon painting” in a black box just as you did. The only difference is that I used Crayola crayons instead of making my own. I had to buy thousands of crayons to get enough in certain colors. This “painting” was a family project conceived and executed for a friend who loves crayons. I wish I had a photo to share because it is remarkable how similar the technique is. One of these paintings was enough for us!
    Sincerely,
    Robin

  • onemancan says:

    Quoting:
    Regan DuCasse on March 2, 2009 said:

    Not to be observed close up. Makes one feel farsighted. I’m an artist myself and struggle with interest enough to stay on task day after day. I suppose I’m trying to understand the sort of person to takes found, ready made objects and with so much deliberation, creates rather simplistic pieces.
    Crayons are marvelous as instruments of color application. I think in so many ways, the effect here is paint by numbers. The closer one inspects these, the blurrier the picture, the more evident the crayon. Whereas, the application of strokes, the style that conveys wrist control and the extension of brain, through arm, through hand and fingers isn’t a part of this scheme.
    I like crayons, especially the old fashioned way of utility. This might be a ‘new ‘ way of using them, but there is no intimacy, I would think…along the way like there is when one is drawing a sketch with them. I imagine you have to stand WAY back constantly, perhaps even use a grid scheme to put the colors in the right area. There is no epiphany of sensation here, no warmth (hah, that would melt the crayons!), no sense of individuality, other than the novel use of crayons as a kind of pixel.
    Must be hell to dust….

    I respond… “How short-sighted of you.”

  • JennaH says:

    Interesting. I don’t care much for the random colors inserted in rows though – they make my eyes hurt.

    And Regan DuCasse seems like an art SNOB. Get over yourself!

  • Kristie says:

    I think that art is defined by the person who is observing art. Obviously, some people are going to like it and some are not. Art was not made to be critiqued, it was made because someone wanted to tell a story, relay a feeling, say something, live something, let out frustrations, etc., and so on and so forth. For Regan to come in here and openly degrade this man’s art obviously upset some people, it even upset me (of course, that is likely because I cannot stand to see people being crude in any sense of the word.) Although he was simply stating his opinion, he did it in a way that seemed almost pompous. And, again, I say art is defined by the person who is observing the art.

    That being said, I think that this does very much remind me of Chuck Close’s pieces. Yet instead of using a grid and paint, you’ve actually used crayons in their whole form and created a work that still has values. The care– and concentration and patience– shown by picking or making these crayons and placing them in the correct spaces really shows. I really believe I love these little compilations of crayons. But I do have to agree with JennaH. The random insertions of bright colors in the more earthen tones and dark tones are a bit distracting, slightly taking away from the piece. I would really like to see the crayons melted too, just to see how that would work out.

    I hope everyone will be considerate before they “critique” an artwork.

    -Kristie

  • Christine says:

    bobby, I agree 100%. If I like what I see, then I like what I see. I don’t care if it’s art or if there was feeling or emotions being put into it. Obviously there WAS an emotion there, why else would they make it? I really don’t think a robot would make art because art is pointless. But humans have emotions, so we like to see pretty things. The End.

    Regan, go play with your crayons like a good kid, ok?

  • Maxine.Revolution says:

    Stunning! Wow I love crayons :)

  • Wow, that’s pretty impressive. Very colourful and clever. Wouldn’t want to let my kids near it though and i agree it would be hell to dust.

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